The Story of Letters and their Kickstarter campaign

The Story of Letters and their Kickstarter campaign

The Story of Letters and their Kickstarter campaign

🕹️ Crowdfunding Game

Martina Hotz

Co-Founder

Letters - a written adventure

Letters is a heartwarming coming of age story about finding the right words.

🇨🇭 Zurich, Switzerland

📅 September 2018

🏆 3 Founders

💵 Kickstarter raised over $24k

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Intro

Who are you and please tell us about Letters.

5am Games was founded in 2018 with the goal to create unique games with strong aesthetics and relatable stories. As an all-women dev team we combine our experiences to create authentic female protagonists and hope that games like Letters can play it’s part in changing the male dominated narrative in games.

We love experimenting and coming up with innovative game mechanics. We want our players to think out of the box and enjoy something they have never seen before.

In our first big project Letters – a written adventure, we invite players to use text in a completely new way. We take elements from traditional word-games and reinvent them in an adventure game scenario which completely changes their appeal and character. We use text to build our game world and let players use the power of words to rewrite it.

Product

Tell us about the process of creating Letters.

Aleksandra Iakusheva created the first prototype for our word-based mechanic 2015 in our first year of university. First Selina Capol, then Martina Hotz joined her to make a real game out of it together. We created the first prototype of Letters in 2017 and applied for a grant from the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia. To our great joy we actually won the grant which motivated us to found a company and solely focus on creating Letters in 2018. We plan to release the game in 2021.

We all created games before but Letters is our first commercial game project.

Kickstarter Marketing Strategy

How did you launch the Kickstarter campaign?

The Kickstarter campaign launched on October 22nd 2019. We had a website, twitter, facebook, instagram, discord and a newsletter before launching the campaign where we posted quite regularly. We used those channels as well as our private ones to spread the word. In the last ten days of the campaign we posted at least twice a day on every channel to boost our engagement and used different facebook groups, discord channels, imgur and reddit to increase our reach.

We spent a small sum for ads on twitter and facebook but it wasn’t very transparent to us how well they worked.

We were featured by AlphaBetaGamer, PowerUpGaming and couple of other websites (they’ve found us on Twitter). Also our Demo was featured by itch.io and was on their front page for at least one week. All for free.

What really helped in terms of PR – posting on all our social media three-four times a day, also we got on the front page of Imgur with a post about our game studio.

Final Thoughts

What are your sources of inspiration?

Letters is inspired by the branching storyline of Life is Strange, the personal feel of A Normal Lost Phone, the nostalgia of Emily Is Away Too and our own experiences growing up.

All of us love unique game mechanics, authentic female characters and casual, comfy games without unnecessary violence. We think that words matter, but they often get overlooked in video games. By borrowing elements from traditional word-games like Scrabble and combining them with a wonderful story, beautiful art, and charming characters, we want to show everyone that words are fun.

What’s been the biggest business challenge you’ve overcome?

Even though we work on an extremely small budget, it’s still expensive to own a company. Being based in Switzerland, the costs of living are very high, especially in Zurich. Also we work 60-100% on our game so there isn’t much time to work outside of the company.

We also don’t work with a publisher or investor which means that we need to collect the money for the production, business costs and commercialisation on our own beside our work on the game itself.

We apply for all grants, awards and accelerator programs we can and have been very lucky so far. We’ve won three grants in Switzerland and were part of three national and international accelerator programs. And now our Kickstarter campaign was funded too! Everything together has kept us afloat until now and will ensure that our company will continue to exist for many more months to come.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

We are friends with many game designers and young entrepreneurs in the industry. Their support is and always has been invaluable. So always be active in your local game dev scene, show your game to as many people as possible and ask them for help and feedback.

Create social media channels for your game or post about them regularly as soon as you have something to show. It can be very basic, it can be something that will change in the future but be present on social media to grow a community early on.

Where can we learn more?

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The Story of Viking Vengeance

The Story of Viking Vengeance

The Story of Viking Vengeance

👏Crowdfunding

Bogdan Radu

Co-Founder

Lowpoly Interactive

We are an indie game development studio, passionate about history and making games that will take you on journeys inside mythical worlds, challenge you and tell you stories you might be familiar with, but from a new perspective, through unique aesthetics and design.

🇷🇴 Romania

📅 November 2018

🏆 2 Founders

💵 Kickstarter in progress, Hoping to raise $30k

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Intro

Who are you and what business did you start?

My name is Bogdan Radu and I am the founder of an indie game development company called Lowpoly Interactive. I have more than 6 years in the gaming industry, I have co-founded mobile game companies in the past as well as various online communities related to Game Modding, 3D Modeling and Game Development.

I have founded Lowpoly Interactive to be a PC and Consoles Game Developer with retro vibes, unique aesthetics and a mix of features never before seen in RPG games. We are all fans of the older Blizzard games like Warcraft3, Diablo2 which were always our source of inspiration. We are also passionate about history and making games that will take you on journeys inside mythical worlds, challenge you and tell you stories you might be familiar with, but from a new perspective. 

Our team is composed of people from 4 continents: America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

Our first standalone project as a team is Viking Vengeance. Viking Vengeance is a Narrative-Driven Rogue-Lite Dungeon Crawler in which you use the power of the Gods to stop the Templar Oppression. Inspired by Norse Mythology the game takes place in an Alternate History with many twists and new mechanics within a Lowpoly Cartoonish World.

Our products are unique through the gameplay mechanics we introduce as well as the artistic style we use to create our heroes and our worlds. Some of these features are the fact that you have to devote your life to a Norse God, bring offerings to them and use their aid in battle, as well as face the Afterlife challenges in Valhalla after death. 

If you want to find out more about our game and see trailers or screenshots, check out our steam page: https://www.vikingvengeancegame.com/steam Don’t forget to wishlist and follow our game.

Product

Tell us about the process of creating Viking Vengeance.

I personally have more than 6 years in the gaming industry and I helped deliver hundreds of small mobile games as well as a few PC/VR games. 

The development lasted 13 months so far and we still have a long road ahead of us. Our design process is based on documentation, experimentation, discussions with our community. Our main Game Designer, Story Writer and 3D Modeler is Lucian Ionescu and our Lead Animator that brought our characters to life is Darrel Magpali. 

As a team we have known each other since 2011 when we founded an online community together for Warcraft 3 Game Modders.

Marketing Strategy

Walk us through your pre-launch marketing...

We launched on 21st of November 2019. We had made marketing efforts for more than 6 months in trying to promote our Steam page, via Facebook, Twitter, Reddit or Imgur.

In our niche we also had to prepare a Demo of our game to show people a vertical slice of our product.

We shared our campaign with friends and family, our existing userbase and followers. We have started telling people of our future launch 7 days before on Discord, Steam, Twitter and Facebook.

Did you do any advertising for your Kickstarter?

We ran and will continue to run Facebook campaigns of UA.

We also posted on Reddit and Imgur and our post became viral on IMGUR having more than 60k views.

We were featured on a few publications for free after we released the press kit as well as some twitchers and youtubers played our game and posted their reactions which made us extremely proud.

The most effective way of receiving pledges I would say is have an active community and make sure your users know about your crowdfunding campaign.

Final Thoughts

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs about Kickstarter?

I would advise other entrepreneurs to take their time with the Kickstarter campaign, plan ahead, don’t rush it, make sure you build enough momentum and excitement and that your community knows what you are planning. Try to reach out to other campaigns and try to get cross-promotions going between you. Contact press, influencers, youtubers even before you launch the campaign. Make sure you select a good period for Kickstarter (We found out the hard way that late November and December are more difficult)

How are things today and what are your plans for the future?

We intend to continue working on Viking Vengeance adding new content, free and paid DLC every 2 months. We intend to keep growing the userbase and keep people engaged with new content, new game modes, multiplayer features.

At the moment we thrilled about the reactions we have been receiving and with more than 14,000 people wishlisting us on Steam we are hopeful about our future launch and we are confident we will be able to deliver a game that people will love.

Where can we learn more?

You can find more about us on our website: https://www.lowpolyinteractive.com/

And you can also check us out on social media: https://www.facebook.com/lowpolyinteractive/ https://twitter.com/lowpolyint

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The Story of Tio Špicar and Survivaland

The Story of Tio Špicar and Survivaland

The Story of Tio Špicar and Survivaland

Game Story

Tio Špicar

Tio Špicar

Survivaland

It’s a 3D adventure puzzle game, puzzles and riddles will guide you through story and adventure.

🇱🇹 Croatia

📅 Founded October 2019

🏆 1 Founder

💵 Monthly Revenue = NA 

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Who are you and what game did you create?

Hi, my name is Tio Špicar. I’m 18 years old high school student passioned about games. I am programming for about 7 years now. In past I made couple smaller android and PC games, mostly during game jams, and few months ago decided that I am ready to give a shot to my first biggest and commercial project. Survivaland was inspired by many games like No Man’s Sky, Slime Rancher, Fortnite but mostly by the recent game Supraland. I really liked that puzzle game genre and stylized graphics, so I took a pen and a paper and start sketching.

After intense brainstorming I came up with the title and some basic story about space traveler that will crash on some unknown planet and have to survive there. Also that’s where the title is coming from: Survive + Land = Survivaland. During summer I was working about 3 or 4 hours prety much every day, but since the school now started I don’t have a lot of time and I am applying for the college this year so I am working here and there as much as I can. This “working” was from the beginning mostly just watching Brackey’s videos and learning, but once you get into that it become easy and smooth.

I’m not making any specific type of the games, actually I would like to try making as many types of games as possible. It slowly start to be boring working on the same game for months and years, trust me I know, especially when you are working alone like I do and have to do everything, from graphics, modeling, coding, music, sounds, promotion…

Walk us through the process of creating Survivaland.

To make a game you first need an idea, in my opinion that’s the most important step in making game, because no matter how good it looks like, if idea is bad and boring no one will play it. After you got the idea you should start plannqing things like which engine will you use, for which platform are you building a game, graphics style, how long will it take you to finish the game and so on.

I have created several games before, for android and PC. First game I ever made using Unity was Gravity cube and I published it on Google Play Store. I also took a part in some game jams. Game jam is competition for game enthusiasts where you are given a theme and you have one week, three days or so to make a game from scratch. You can play my games I made for game jams on this link: https://timbelion.itch.io.I think beside they are fun you learn a lot from game jams and you have opportunity to connect with other game developers.

Where are you at in terms of launch?

I haven’t yet launched my game, Im not nearly close to the launch, but I hope I will be some day. I am planning to launch it on steam and If I will have time I will make my website. Before launching I hope I will be able to promote my game through some blogs, interviews, videos or whatever I could. Promotion is the most important thing and it affects on your sales a lot.

What are some of the most effective ways that you attract people to your game?

I have a youtube channel with about 200 subscribers and I am posting frequent devlog videos and some tutoritals and speed modeling videos. Devlog is development vlog where creator is showcasing how did he spent day or week developing his game. Beside youtube I am also posting short updates on reddit and this is where I attract most people. I also have a discord server where I am posting some pictures of progress and twitter profile with about 25 followers.

What are your sources of inspiration?

My primary sources of inspiration is art. I think making a game is like an art. Only limitation is your imagination. And you just need to know how to transfer it from your head in the computer. To build a community and start my channel I was inspired by some great youtubers like Thin Matrix and Dani. They are great example of successful indie game developers that started on their own. Life would be extremely monotone if I would do only game development and for me music is very important thing in my life, honestly I don’t know now how would I make anything without it.

What’s been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far creating Survivaland?

I wouldn’t really call it business challenge, but It was hard for me to start promoting my game and posting updates. I was really afraid to start a youtube channel because I was afraid what others will think, but I knew it was very important thing to do if I want to grew the community. There was no other solution for that than just do it. My first videos was very bad, but I kept going.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

Be very creative. Try a lot new things and see what works for you. If you are not creative your game won’t be either and that will reflect on people that you might expect would play your game.

If it’s your first time making some bigger game, be patient. You might think you will finish it in quickly but as you make progress you will see it will actually take you way longer than you first thought.

When making a game you will face a lot of obstacles on every step, so you have to be persistent. Stick to the problem and don’t give up no matter how hard it is.

Plan as much as you can. Planning is a great way, especially at the beginning, to stay continuous. You will be able to track your progress and you will see that you are actually going somewhere. There are some websites that can help you planning, like Trello, that I am using.

How are things today and what are your plans for the future?

Currently I have no monthly income. I am planning to grow my community, especially youtube channel, and continue working on my game. I would also like to create my own website and open a patreon profile.

Where can we learn more?

You can track my progress and watch some tutorials on my channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvVA6XucF6LB0Re4qZ52fag?view_as=subscriber

Join my discord server where you can talk with other game developers:

https://discord.gg/PGfSmW6

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/Timbelion

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How Charty Party raised over $150k crowdfunding

How Charty Party raised over $150k crowdfunding

How Charty Party raised over $150k crowdfunding

Kickstarter + Indiegogo

Evan Katz

Evan Katz

Co-Founder

Charty Party

The adult card game of absurdly funny charts

🇺🇸 Memphis, TN

📅 November 2018

🏆 2 Founders

💵 Raised $50k on Kickstarter and additional $100k on Indiegogo

The story of how Evan Katz co-founded Charty Party, the adult card game of absurdly funny charts, and raised over $150k between Kickstarter and Indiegogo!

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Intro

Who are you and tell us about Charty Party!

I’m Evan Katz, co-founder of Charty Party. Charty Party, often called “Cards Against Humanity for nerds,” is an adult party game centered around making ridiculous charts and graphs. My friend Josh Roberts and I had the idea for the game mid-November of 2018, and launched our Kickstarter mid-January of 2018.

Charty Party has been a great fit for those looking for a party game that involves a bit of thinking and enjoy some absurdist humor. Each round centers around a “chart card,” which will present a graph — a graph of age with a trendline that peaks at age 13, for example. Players play their funniest card to name the Y-axis of the graph. So, what peaks when you’re 13 — “Legitimate fear of receiving a wedgie?” “Willingness to use a swimsuit as underwear?” “Fear of bees?”

At the moment, Charty Party is our only product, but we’re working on expansion packs and a brand new party game that will launch this winter.

Product

Tell us about the process of creating the Charty Party game.

Both Josh and I work for a small business strategy consulting firm, so we have some experience helping other companies launch products. This is our first board game, however. We initially designed the game on sticky notes to test proof of concept, and then slowly increased the product quality with each playtest, moving to cards on Google Slides and then eventually printing a test version from TheGameCrafter.com. We worked with a local designer to help us create the final design.

We used some forum posts to help determine manufacturer options, but initially only expected to sell about 300 copies, so we were planning to print them individually from TheGameCrafter.com. As our Kickstarter grew, we looked at PrintNinja as a manufacturer, but eventually ended up using LongPack as our provider once we knew we’d be manufacturing games in the thousands.

Marketing Strategy

Walk us through your pre-launch marketing for Charty Party...

We moved pretty quickly once we had the idea, not because we had any particular deadline, but because we knew how often founders fall into the trap of working on their concepts for months (years) and then having it fall flat. We didn’t know if we’d be successful, so we wanted to get the concept into the world as quickly as possible. We made a simple landing page on Squarespace to collect email addresses.

We did some initial posting about our concept on Reddit in subreddits focused on funny charts, and were able to get about 400 email pre-signups to our website. We didn’t do any Facebook ad pre-marketing (though in hindsight, we should have.)

Once we launched, we shared as much as we could on our social platforms, but despite lots of shares from friends this all lost momentum after about $2,500 raised. All other backers came from Facebook ads.

Did you do any advertising for your Kickstarter?

It’s now quite obvious to us that if we hadn’t figured out the power of Facebook ads on the third day of our campaign, we wouldn’t have even come close to reaching our $10,000 goal. Luckily, we were able to use Kickstarter’s link tracking function to track the success of our Facebook ads, and realized that running pictures of funny card combinations were a great way to show off our game concept. Once we started to see a 3x-5x return on ads, we felt comfortable pouring our own money into the campaign. We ended up spending $5,000 in ad spend during the campaign (to raise $50,000). Looking back, we should have spent more — Kickstarter tends to bring in about 25% of whatever you raise in organic traffic, and we should have taken more advantage of that.

We didn’t get any press during the campaign, but have gotten some since. Depending on the platform, we’ve seen an article bring in up to 50 additional copies the day of publication. But, PR is hard to bank on and doesn’t last long. Facebook ads continue to be the backbone of how we acquire customers, and we’re spending a significant amount on them every day. But, we’re constantly watching and tracking to make sure our ad spend is profitable — you don’t want to be spending more than your profit margin!

Final Thoughts

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs about Kickstarter?

I’ve spoken with a handful of people trying to launch their own Kickstarter products, and here’s the step-by-step advice I give (it’s the process we plan to follow when we launch our next game, too). Pretty much all of it centers around reducing the chances that you spend a bunch of time/money and your product still fails.

1) Talk to people about your concept, and try to genuinely listen if they want it or not. If you really have to sales pitch them to get them interested, consider changing your idea.

2) Create a basic landing page with some mocked-up images of your product, and run a few Facebook ads (spend about $20). Are people clicking on these ads, sharing them, and/or putting their email in for more info on your site? If not, consider changing your idea.

3) Create a better prototype, have a few people use it in real life, and gather feedback/tweak as needed.

4) Test some more Facebook ads with your better prototype, post about it on Reddit — are people still clicking on your ads, signing up, etc? If you can’t get people to sign up pre-Kickstarter, it’s unlikely this will change once you launch your campaign.

5) If you pass all of the above steps, launch your Kickstarter. Use Kickstarter’s link tracking function to see which ads are getting people to pledge. If you’re getting a profitable result from your ads (don’t forget to account for the production/shipping costs of your product), then you can start pouring more money into your ads.

6) Success! Now the fun part… actually turning this into a viable business. But, if your Kickstarter succeeded, you’re off to a great start.

How are things today and what are your plans for the future of Charty Party?

We can’t share monthly revenue at the moment, but we’re very pleased with how our business has grown over the past year. The majority of our sales currently come from Amazon, but we’re working on getting into more retail locations and working with distributors. To date, we’ve sold about 11,000 copies of Charty Party, and just received our second print run of 10,000 copies.

We’re working on a new party card game (sneak preview: it involves puns) that we’re planning to launch January 2020.

Where can we learn more about Charty Party game?

www.ChartyPartyGame.com

Facebook.com/ChartyPartyGame

evan@chartypartygame.com

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The story of Matthew Brittle developing APEX

The story of Matthew Brittle developing APEX

The story of Matthew Brittle developing APEX

gamedev story

Matthew Brittle

Matthew Brittle

Founder

Apex

Apex is a platform puzzler with an underling story that culminates in a fast paced action platformer.

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 England

🏆 1 Founder

💵 Monthly Revenue = < $500

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Who are you and what game did you create?

My name is Matthew and I’ve always like computers and tinkering with them. At 16 I went to college and started a computer programming A-Level. Even then using the Pascal language I was creating games. Generally remakes of old classics.

In 2008 I learned about xbox360 indie games and started learning XNA. I released my first game called “The gravity effect” the following year and established Riddlersoft Games. Since then I have made around 10 games with varying success. All these games where made in my spare time more as a hobby than anything else.

Typically I work at my other job which is a cleaning job, then in the evenings I program.

I have made many different types of games, but because I work on my own I stick to 2D games.

My most popular games to date have been the “Old School Racer” games. A 2D side scrolling motorbike racing game.

Walk us through the process of creating Apex.

Generally for me when I have an idea for a game, I quickly make a prototype to see how fun the  game is. Then its the process of fleshing the idea out a bit. I keep playing what I’ve made, showing it to friends and then implementing feedback and new stuff. The game changes a lot from the initial prototype to the finished project.

I’ve been working on Apex for the last few months. I originally released it about 7 years ago and thought I would just port it to switch. But as I played it I realized I need to change a lot. Then the person who does art for me suggested a few things and it snowballed into a complete new game.

So I’ve been gradually adding new mechanics and features. The art has had a complete overhaul, most if not all has been replaced, as well as a lot of new art. Then we started thinking about the game and a story just developed over time.

What are some of the most effective ways that you attract people to your game?

I’ve never had much success getting my game out there. Because I’m a very small indie developer most websites and influencers just don’t respond to my emails, or messages. So about a year ago I started listening to podcasts weekly while at work. This enabled me to get to know a lot about the people who run them. Because of this I’ve been able to get involved in the community and get to know people who have contacts in this area.

Apex will be a good test to see how well I can do getting the word out about my game.

What are your sources of inspiration?

I’ve always had an interest in computers and as soon as I learned programming I fell in love with it. Since then I’ve found it relatively easy to make games as I find it fun and rewarding. My main goal is to make something that people will enjoy, so I always like it when a game gets a good response.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

I have found that before you even start make that amazing game you have planned that its best to start with a smaller project that you can learn from. Make a game from start to finish. You will learn so much about what to do and what not to do. As well as that your experience will grow allowing you to make even better games. 

If you compare my first game to Apex there is no comparison. I can’t stress enough how important practicing your craft is.

Also always listen to what people say about your game, and get it out to as may people as you can before you release it. My biggest regret is not listening to people as my as I should have. Its so easy to see your own project only positively and not see the negative. I also found that near the end all I wanted to do was release it and this sometimes made me release something that If i had spent a few more weeks would have been substantially better.

How are things today and what are your plans for the future?

My monthly revenue is very small as I have only recently started making games for switch. So far I have only released Old School Racer 2 on the switch, Even so my revenue for the switch is far better than any other platform I’ve released games on.

My main plans for now are to finish Apex. Once it’s complete I’m going to start learning the Unity engine so that my games will look and play even better.

Where can we learn more?

www.riddlersoftgames.co.uk

Mattlekim@RiddlersoftGame

Apex Info

https://twitter.com/i/status/1191326426605244416

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The Story of Real Welders and the Sky Haven Kickstarter

The Story of Real Welders and the Sky Haven Kickstarter

The Story of Real Welders and the Sky Haven Kickstarter

Kickstarter Story

Evgeniy Gatsalov

Evgeniy Gatsalov

Lead Designer

Sky Haven

An airport tycoon game

🇱🇹 Vilnius, Lithuania

📅 Founded 2017

💵 Monthly Revenue = NA 

The story of Evgeniy Gatsalov, lead designer at Real Welders, and the team developing Sky Haven, an airport tycoon game, and their Kickstarter campaign!

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Who are you and tell us about Real Welders and Sky Haven!

We are Real Welders – a small studio located in Vilnius. Our office employs 5 people: three programmers, an artist and a game designer. And one more 3D artist who works remotely.

We are working on Sky Haven – an airport tycoon game where the player begins to control and build/manage an airport in 1910. And with the course of the game and progress, it all evolves and grass airstrips are ultimately turned into modern international hubs.

This is the most difficult project our team has ever worked on. To control the process, we adhere to the Agile Scrum methodology in terms of daily workflow. As it often happens, our Scrum implementation is very different from the one described in the books. But we do not miss daily standups and sprint planning. After that it’s just a matter of spending the whole day together with everyone trying to get their tasks done and often going over different aspects of the game trying to come to common decisions. Sometimes it gets heated of course when opinions clash which can be a time waster, but it’s probably an unavoidable aspect of game development.

Walk us through the process of creating Sky Haven.

We have been working on Sky Haven for 2.5 years. None of us had worked on a project for so long. We have all been in the industry for a long time, but before that we were all mainly engaged in mobile games. Although there is one bearded nerd in the team who worked on VR at EA.

The idea came almost impulsively – we didn’t even spend too much time thinking about the kind of game we wanted to make – just during the last game we were making someone suggested it and we just knew that that would be the next thing we would make, but then it’s just been a challenge after challenge in every aspect from game design to visuals, etc. To this day we constantly hit roadblocks that we need to figure out how to overcome, but we feel that it’s heavily due to the nature of this type of game genre where a single change affects most of everything else in the game so we always keep having to fix everything.

What are some of the most effective ways that you attract people to your game?

Sky Haven is a pretty niche game. During the development, we have created a small but very cool community. During all this time we have been sharing development news on Twitter and on discord. By the way, the discord server was launched and is managed not by us, but by the community.

Now we have started a kickstarter campaign to gather everyone who is interested in the game and to involve them more in the development process. We plan to distribute builds among backers, receive feedback, share plans with them and together choose which features to implement in the first place.

What are your sources of inspiration for SkyHaven?

All of us have our own different sources of inspiration, but as a team we can all agree on inspirational people like Jonathan blow whose insight into the gaming world is just fascinating and deeply inspiring, Sid Meier whose types of games are a big inspirational part to the game we’re currently making as well as many other similar games from other people like Cities Skylines, Sims, Factorio, etc.

We also like to keep in touch with the gaming world by listening to Youtube channels like: Get indie gaming, GDC / GDC Vault, The Quartering, Sebastian Lague etc.

What’s been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far creating Sky Haven?

As for many teams – the main challenge for us always remains the underestimation of deadlines. We are working on it, trying to be flexible to minimize fails. Nevertheless, the development of some features gets out of control and takes much longer.

It’s difficult to deal with it, because when you love what you do and want to do it as well as possible, it’s very difficult to deal with time constraints. We constantly try to fight with this, discussing features, we decide together what we plan to finish, and what we will postpone, etc.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

Make a prototype that is fun to play. It sounds banal, everyone knows it, but very often it is neglected. Making a good game is much easier if you have a good prototype. Moreover, finding a good publisher and even getting financing is easier if you have a good prototype.

Do not be afraid to spend time on a raw ugly looking prototype. Game development takes a huge amount of time. You will definitely redo the game more than once. But if you have a good prototype – if you have a good foundation, then you might be able to remake the game significantly less times and hit the bullseye much faster. Perhaps, to make these decisions, experience and development pain are needed. We have already accumulated enough of that, so next time we will invest much more time in a prototype before moving forward.

How are things today and what are your plans for the future of the Sky Haven Kickstarter?

Our immediate goal is a successful kickstarter. Then we release an alpha version with gameplay that covers the 1910-1940 period. Next, we plan to regularly release updates according to our roadmap. And as a result, by August 2020 we are planning an Early Access release.

Each new time period in the game will include new mechanics, new features. By releasing these periods gradually, receiving feedback from our backers, we can improve stability and gameplay and make the game that will appeal to us and the community.

On an additional note – in less than a week we have collected more than 40% of our kickstarter goal and received warm support from the players. This is very inspiring and gives strength to work on the game.

ROADMAP https://bit.ly/2Xd51IX

Where can we learn more about the Sky Haven Kickstarter and Real Welders?

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The story of Jandê Saavedra Farias and the team developing Sky Racket

The story of Jandê Saavedra Farias and the team developing Sky Racket

The story of Jandê Saavedra Farias and the team developing Sky Racket

Startup Story

Jandê Saavedra Farias

Jandê Saavedra Farias

Art Director

Sky Racket

A colorful and zany space tennis adventure, Sky Racket is the world’s first Shmup Breaker.

🇧🇷 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

📅 Founded 2013

🏆 4 Founders

💵 Monthly Revenue = NA 

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Who are you and what business did you start?

My name is Jandê Saavedra Farias, and I am a Graphics Design bachelor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. I worked as an Art Director on Sky Racket, an arcade-inspired game that mixes the action from Shoot ‘em ups with the fun of Block Breakers, as if Gradius and Arkanoid had a colorful, crazy, fun, nonsensical, cartoonish baby. We’re calling it a Shmup Breaker. Sky Racket was heavily inspired by the games we played as kids, from Sega, Nintendo and Arcades, and cartoons, old and new.

Double Dash Studios was founded as a four people ensemble. Kim Kaznowski as our Programmer, Lucas Thiers as our Game Designer and me and Luiza Shimura as Artists. As our scopes and projects grew we added more people, with different skills and background. Double Dash now has 10 people plus a few frequent collaborators. As the team started to expand so did our responsibilities and ways to tackle everyday tasks. Nowadays, the first thing I do when arriving into office is writing my “Daily”, which is basically listing everything I did the day before, what went right and what went wrong, then making a to-do list for the day. We then share each other’s dailies and complete whatever new tasks came up from this conversation. From there on, I start doing my tasks, checking possible emails, talking about main and future projects and doing whatever comes up that might need my input. Nowadays, after we released Sky Racket, it’s a bit rare for me be that much hands on creating art directly, I’m mainly giving feedback to the other artists, looking for references and, well, doing my job as an Art Director. But from time to time something always comes up that allows me to draw or design something.

We’ve been working since 2015 on personal projects, commissioned games and some other more specific art and programming jobs. We’ve worked with some different brands, from international brands like Cartoon Network to more regional companies from Rio de Janeiro and Brazil. We’ve worked with a lot of different genres throughout the years. Counting comissioned, work, gamejams, personal projects, we’ve touched on adventure games, puzzles, puzzle-platformers, run-and-gun platformers, casual mobile, shoot ‘em up, shmup breaker (as we call Sky Racket), runners, arcade-style maze chasers, you name it. It doesn’t matter what we do, we always try to imprint the Double Dash style into the games: maybe through the mechanics, or the art, or even the humor. We really like exploring well established mechanics and applying a new twist to it – that’s how we got to Sky Racket, for example. I think it’s important for the player, or the possible client, to feel the quality and notice our games are thoroughly planned and made with a lot of care.

Walk us through the process of creating Sky Racket.

Sky Racket took approximately 2,5 years of development. It’s a bit hard to be precise because the first prototype for the game was made during a gamejam in 2015. We did this 72-hour gamejam called Indies vs Gamers, at the GameJolt website. We created a very well-polished infinite version of Sky Racket (named RacketBoy, back then): it was basically a rough version of the first level in a 4:3 aspect (to reference the Arcade theme of the gamejam) with infinite waves of enemies coming at you. That prototype actually got first place in the gamejam, which got our game to be played by a lot of youtubers during that time, including the three sponsors of the gamejam: Pewdiepie, Markiplier and Jackscepticeye, and that’s when we thought we had a possible winner in our hands. For the next few months we worked on it, trying to do some new content, testing mobile porting, we even tried doing a (unsuccessful) crowdfunding campaign. But inevitably we had to work on something else to make money, so we set it aside for a while and started to make the company grow. We never stopped taking the game to events or even mentioning it in our social media, because we knew we’d go back to it one day. A couple of years later, in 2017, we had the opportunity to apply for a government grant from the Brazilian Film Agency (ANCINE). It was the first grant of its kind, and no one knew quite what to expect. We sent the project and after a few different judging phases, we won! We had to wait until 2018 to receive the money and that’s when the newly-named Sky Racket (because we added RacketGirl to the game) went into full production.

As I said before, we had quite a few experiences creating games. During game jams, for clients, working for other gamedev companies as individuals, but Sky Racket was our first experience creating a big game, something that took more than a year to complete. We had to learn a lot more about team managing, time managing, cutting the fat, prioritizing, and a lot of other things that you really only get to know through experience, and might just make or break any project.

How did you launch?

We launched Sky Racket in October 22. It seemed like a date far from other big games, and it was a Tuesday, when pizzas are a bit cheaper. 

Well, we had to learn how to market our game, and that means starting a whole new relationship with the press. We did try to reach out to a lot of youtubers, websites and other different regular channels, but I believe what gave us a lot of return were the Steam Curators. A lot of them are also small to medium sized youtubers and journalists, so as we looked into getting good reviews by curators, we also ended up getting quite a few videos and articles. We are a little bit known in Brazil, so we could reach out to some gaming media here, which helps a lot. We did build our own website. We have a website dedicated for Sky Racket (www.skyracket.com) and one for the company (www.doubledashstudios.com).

What are some of the most effective ways that you attract people to your game?

We’ve been talking to a lot of streamers on Twitch as well, inviting them to play the game and encouraging them to recommend the game to other streamers which has been working really well, especially with brazilian streamers. We are also usually have a very good presence in events here in Brazil: Sky Racket was often invited to shows and even nominated for a few awards. We are also slowly building a community through Discord (which has steadily increased in membership and participation since we released the game) and our social media pages under the name @DoubleDashStu.

We tried doing a crowdfunding campaign back in 2015, trying to ride the youtuber attention we got from winning the game jam, but we couldn’t reach the goal. We were very inexperienced back then, and those things take time to be done right.

What are your sources of inspiration?

We are a very diverse group, so we take inspiration from a lot of different things: games, movies, cartoons, books, comics, music… I think it’s pretty obvious, as a lot of people pointed out, how our game takes inspiration from 60s anime (RacketBoy’s Astro Boy-esque hair, for example) as well as more recent cartoons such as Adventure Time and Steven Universe. Personally, I grew up playing Sega games in the 80s and 90s with the Sega Master System and Mega Drive, that’s something that had a very strong influence when trying to emulate that era. Fantasy Zone, for example, with its colorful pastel visuals and cute enemies was a big reference when first designing the crazy world of Sky Racket. The parallax effects of some early Mega Drive games like Sonic and Arrow Flash also always amazed me and was one of the first things I wanted to do when creating the backgrounds.

Double Dash Studios is also a founding member of RING, the Indie Game Developers Group in Rio de Janeiro. We’ve met a LOT of great devs throughout the last few years, exchanging experience, knowledge, opportunities, success and failure stories. This kind of unity between devs is fairly new here in Rio, and has been doing great things for the scene here. We try doing monthly events, sometimes even bringing people from the outside for lectures, or reaching out to the public to playtest our games and get to know a bit more about game developing.

What’s been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far creating SkyRacket?

Well, everything non game-related, I believe. Learning how to deal with contracts, managing people, looking for office space, dealing with clients (good and bad), dealing with money, payments, salaries, banks, creating a company, talking to lawyers and accountants, maneuvering around bureaucracy… I think a lot of indie devs never take these things into account when thinking about creating a videogame company, but, well, it IS a company. We were lucky to know a few people that already had walked that path before, so we had someone to ask for guidance, but still, it’s kind of scary to have all these responsibilities suddenly falling on our shoulders.

Now, being a company, we need to survive financially, and every new day, week, month, year is filled with little decisions that might impact not only on our future, but also on people that work with us. We learned that being transparent can be a very good thing. We try to be very open with everyone, always explaining the risks and situations we are getting into so no one is surprised by sudden changes or if something hits us. It also helps a lot when thinking about solutions for possible problems that might come.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

Well, I believe first of all, you have to make games. People often ask “how do I begin to make games?” and I always answer “Look for a game jam”. Some devs like working alone, having their finger in every single aspect of the game, and that’s great, but some (like me) prefer working on a few aspects of the game and having other people do other things. Game jams are a great way to begin because you can create on your own, you can create with a group of friends, you can create with complete strangers, but you have to create. Having a finite amount of very focused time is a great way to gather experience in a lot of things: brainstorming, prototyping, creating art, programming, music, learning to prioritize, learning to let things go. It’s not by accident that so many great indie games are a product of game jams (such as Super Hot, Goat Simulator, Gods Will Be Watching and, well, Sky Racket!). It’s a great way to let creativity flow and do something crazy and experimental, and learn new stuff. There are a lot of companies that do their own internal game jams in order to dish out new ideas, experiment, and a lot of gold can come out of that.

How are things today and what are your plans for the future?

Right now we are on the post-launch phase of Sky Racket. We’ve been doing a lot of marketing efforts, talking to people, streamers, youtubers, doing interviews (like this one!) and trying to get the game in as many hands as possible. All of that while still doing some commissioned work. Our monthly revenue is very unstable since we still don’t have any kind of regular income. Sky Racket is our first commercial release and we hope that might turn into a nice source of income in the next few months, especially after we port and launch it on consoles next year. The majority of our sales are still from Brazil, but we’re trying to branch out. We’ve got some attention from the US, Russia and Japan, and because of that we made efforts to localize the game for those regions, but we still need to really reach that public.

We’re on the talks now about our next game. We have a lot of projects in the drawer, some more developed than others, that we would love to do. It’s all a matter of finding out which one makes more sense for us right now. Even though Sky Racket is and will be our main game for a while, we want to try something different, new mechanics, new genres (our projects vary from puzzle games to metroidvanias and other more experimental ideas) and a whole new universe of characters.

Where can we learn more?

We are on nearly every major social network, and we are very approachable! We love giving and receiving feedback, talking about games and anything else. We are always present in our Discord server as well to whoever wants to talk to us.

Sky Racket: https://store.steampowered.com/app/994500/Sky_Racket/

Discord: https://discord.gg/doubledashstu

Instagram: @DoubleDashStu

Twitter: @DoubleDashStu

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoubleDashSTU/

Website: www.doubledashstudios.com

www.skyracket.com

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Unbread: An early story about a game without a deadline.

Unbread: An early story about a game without a deadline.

Unbread: An early story about a game without a deadline.

Startup Story

Sherif Salama

Sherif Salama

Founder

Unbread

A metroidvania about the emotional life of a zombie stuck in a toaster.

🇪🇬 Egypt

📅 Founded January 2017

🏆 1 Founder

💵 Monthly Revenue = NA

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Who are you and what business did you start?

My name is Sherif Salama. I’m a Cairo University computer engineering student in the middle of dropping out in the pursuit of a dream of making indie games. For the past 2 years, I’ve been struggling with the guilt of being in the top university in Africa, and that I’ve had to postpone my dreams to finish my studies. But lately I’ve realized that the educational system is too flawed and helped make taking the decision easier to drop out and follow my dreams. 

I’m currently a solo developer working on a PC & console game about the emotional life of a zombie stuck in a toaster, hence why it’s called ‘Unbread’. I do all the programming, art, & animation in the game. In a way this game is my way of projecting my real life struggles that I’ve found in life into an artform that is a video game. The game is without a deadline as the aim of the game is not to release a finished product, but to give me a daily exercise where I can continuously become a better game developer than yesterday.

I have a wonderful full-time freelance job in game development to support myself financially while I work on my dream game Unbread. I work 5 times a week, 8 hours spent on my fulltime job, 3-4 hours spent on Unbread. Even though I have the leisure of working anytime I want from home, I have found that I am most productive when I’m working on a fixed daily schedule just like I would in a normal job. It helps condition myself that important stuff needs to get done before playtime.

Walk us through the process of creating Unbread so far...

I’m currently one year into development. It’s really weird, you know? Because at this point I thought I’d get tired of this project, but honestly my joy working on Unbread keeps getting incremented every single day. There’s just something different about working on a project with no deadlines when you get to see yourself improve in skill everyday as a game developer. It sort of feels like I’m playing a real life MMO where I’m constantly leveling up my skills, finishing quests, and when I show my work to real people on social media, that’s when I get the rewards from these quests. I feel so warm reading all these wonderful comments about people giving me feedback on my game. Even though the majority of it is positive feedback, I specially enjoy the negative ones. Because that’s when you know someone has cared enough about the project that they’d want it to be the best it could be.

I’ve worked on another game, of course. I’ve made a small mobile game about protecting an oyster from sea monsters that are tired of hearing his puns. It’s called Seas The Day. Of course this isn’t the kind of project that represents me as the game developer that I am and want to be, nor the kind of games that I make, but that doesn’t keep me from being proud of it as my first project as a game developer. I’ve created Seas The Day with the intention of creating and finishing the simplest game I could think of just to see if I belong in the game dev community or to find out early if it isn’t something for me. To my luck, it was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had, and because of it, I’ve managed to make great game dev friends in the journey such as the developer from Ori & The Blind Forest!

What are some of the most effective ways that you attract people to your game?

I usually post progress about my game on Reddit and see what strangers think about my game. It helps me get genuine feedback from people who have never seen my game before and point me in the right direction if there’s anyway I can improve my work. It’s a lot different than showing my work to my friends, colleagues, & people already fans of the games as they can sometimes feel pressured to show more kindness than I deserve in their feedback, but it’s definitely worth it to see their reactions whenever they enjoy something I’ve made. I’ve created a Twitter to share progress on the game for people who are interested in the project.

Not so long ago, I’ve been asked by interested Redditors to create a Discord for Unbread, and oh my it was the most wonderful thing that has ever happened. I’ve watched people come and discuss Unbread, create memes, fan-art about the game. I’ve made a prototype of the game in which people had been speedrunning for weeks and kept stealing each other’s title for the top speedrunner title. It’s honestly such a fun ride, and I can’t wait to see what’s in store next.

What are your sources of inspiration?

My sources of inspiration consist of the following:

Hollow Knight: The game that ruined other metroidvanias for me. After playing this game other metroid just couldn’t compete in the same level of game design, gameplay, and magnificent world building.  And to think it’s only been made by 3 people.

Cuphead: An absolutely breathtaking game with absolute excellence in animation quality that has been made by only 2 people.

Antichamber: A game created with sheer dedication and struggle of one man in 7 years. One man that didn’t have the best talent nor skill, nor has he ever relied on luck to create the best game he could. The man that adventured throughout his journey on his search to answer to what makes not only a successful game, but a great game.

What’s been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far creating Unbread?

The hardest decision I’ve ever made was to go solo and pursue a fulltime job while working on my own studio. At first I didn’t have any time at all to work on my studio, but recently I’ve scheduled consistent hours to go back to working on Unbread while at the same time helping myself financially.

I do have the opportunity to work with other amazing people to help speed up the process & development of Unbread, but my goal is to develop as a developer, and not rush a finished game. So I’ve found this setting to be the most effective, as well as the most fulfilling.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

Don’t let the guilt of having someone else’s dream life keep you from pursuing your own dreams.

Where can we learn more?

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The Story of Davis Bickford and the 2D action adventure metroidvania PlayBound

The Story of Davis Bickford and the 2D action adventure metroidvania PlayBound

The Story of Davis Bickford and the 2D action adventure metroidvania PlayBound

Startup Story

Davis Bickford

Davis Bickford

Founder

PlayBound

PlayBound is a 2D action adventure metroidvania about Kelvin, a boy whose parents have become fatally boring.

🇺🇸 Westminster, Colorado

📅 Founded 2019

🏆 1 Founders

💵 Monthly Revenue = NA / game in development

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Who are you and what business did you start?

My name is Davis Bickford. I’m the founder and solo developer of Studio Sploot. I’m currently developing a game by the name of PlayBound, a 2D action-adventure metroidvania about Kelvin, a boy whose parents have become fatally boring.

I handle the programming, artwork, game design, writing, outreach, etc. The portions I’m not doing myself are Music and SFX, which are being created by Darby Burkhalter and Derrick Bozkurt, respectively.

By day, I work from home as a developer for a marketing company. Because I am building a game in addition to working a full time job, I typically start my day off early at 5:30am so I have time to exercise, make breakfast, walk the pugs and work on PlayBound before I log in for work. 

Although I sometimes work on PlayBound in the evenings and weekends, I generally prefer to leave those times open to spend time with my wife, Lacey, and our pugs, Lady and Idgie.

Walk us through the process of creating PlayBound so far...

I started learning game development in mid-2017 and began teasing at the idea for a game that would eventually become PlayBound. In the time since I started, the game has undergone several transformations and I’ve spent a lot of time bettering my skills at programming, artwork and storytelling, amongst others.

For me, the process has been about learning and continual improvement, so timelines have been less important to me than building my skills. Now that I’ve reached a point in my skill levels that feels sufficient for my intended quality of the game, I’ve been showing the game on social media and ramping up the speed of my development.

How are you planning to launch?

At minimum, a full release of PlayBound will be late 2022, possibly later.  I hope to launch a Kickstarter by Q4 in 2020, which will largely be treated like a launch in terms of building my audience and marketing.

My prime goal is to create a game that people love to play as much as I loved creating it. Because of this, I intend to take exactly however much time I need to finish the game and market it. 

Of course, I don’t believe that simply creating a solid experience will take care of sales, so I have also spent time researching methods for marketing and building engagement as well. And I plan to do much more research before I set any definitive dates for Kickstarter and a full release.

What are your sources of inspiration?

Sources of inspiration are in everything. From short conversations with a stranger, to memories of childhood games, every tiny experience or memory is a potential source of inspiration.  

I appreciate overtly inspirational podcasts, blogs, people and stories, etc. But I often find myself most inspired by the daily understated moments . I like to study the way people around me behave, the things they do with ease, or difficulty, and how they handle those moments. I do this with the people I consider role models just as much as the people that I don’t.

Ultimately, in more concrete terms, if I had to recommend specific sources of inspiration, I’d start with the following books:

Mindset by Carol Dweck

Atomic Habits by James Clear

The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women: Why Capable People Suffer from the Imposter Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It by Valerie Young

What’s been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far creating PlayBound?

The biggest challenge for me has been staying motivated and consistent. A lot of the work in game development is fun, challenging and rewarding. But there are a lot of tedious and boring activities that can make development feel like it’s dragging. This can be especially difficult when you’re working alone and don’t have a lot of consistent interaction with others on the project.

For me, the biggest help has been building a daily habit of working on the game, no matter how exciting or dull the work may be, and sharing my progress. Sometimes it’s about embracing the boring days and simply doing *something*, and sometimes it’s about making the most of the high energy days. It can be helpful to share small updates on social media, to not only build up awareness, but to feel an accountability with the daily habit.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

I hesitate to offer any blanket advice to people, but if I could say one thing above anything else, it’s to take care of yourself. For many entrepreneurs, there is often a huge amount of passion driving your ambitions. Even when it doesn’t feel like work, you can quickly burn yourself out if you aren’t careful. 

Get consistent exercise, make time for other things in your life and avoid overworking. If your hobby has become a new business, try out some new hobbies. Try to keep things balanced.  

It’s ok to maintain momentum and stay focused, but when it comes to your relationships and physical or mental health, live by the mantra: “do no harm.”

How are things today and what are your plans for the future?

Things are going really well! My favorite part of the process has been sharing about the game, getting feedback and making connections. For example, getting contacted for this interview is an incredibly humbling and validating learning experience. 

Being early in development, there are no sales or revenue at this time, but many of the interactions and relationships I’ve been creating are invaluable to me. In the end, my goal is still about creating a game that people love to play as much as I loved to create it, and processes like this one are helping me do that.

Where can we learn more?

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The Story behind the Survival Horror game Reading in the Dark

The Story behind the Survival Horror game Reading in the Dark

The Story behind the Survival Horror game Reading in the Dark

Find it on Steam

Leonardo Delafiori

Leonardo Delafiori

Founder

Reading in the Dark / Aspects of Change

Story-driven Survival Horror with unique visuals

🇧🇷 Based in São Paulo, Brazil

📅 Founded February 2019

🏆 1 Founders

💵 Monthly Revenue = NA

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Who are you and what game did you create?

My name is Leonardo Delafiori and I am a college student from Brazil. I have lived around video games ever since I can remember and my dream was always to create and work in the industry. Now I finally released a commercial product on steam and started development on a much bigger project.

At the start of this year, I started working on a strategy casual game called Aspects of change after my teacher asked my class to create a game based on the word “Horoscope”. This game helped me understand the basics of the Unreal engine, as well as 3D modeling. Now I am feeling comfortable on solo developing my dream game,  a survival horror game with a heavy focus on item management called “Reading in the Dark”.

In my day to day workflow, I generally spend way too much time developing and planning what i’m going to do. Now with the addition of my youtube channel that I just created, I seek to not only build hype around my game, but to also build a community of people to talk about game design and study what the great games of our generation did right.

Walk us through the process of creating the game.

When I first started developing Aspects of Change, i had no idea how the Unreal engine or 3D modeling worked, but I had some experience with Unity and Godot. I ended up studying Unreal as i went, learning more and more how to create the game mechanics. Blender was hard to learn at the beginning but now I’m feeling very comfortable with both of the platforms, thanks to the development of Aspects of Change.

A really valuable thing that I learned is that organization is key to having a big project. Now, with Reading in the Dark, i have a big and growing game design document that details all of the features. Also, i have google sheets for: Chronogram on activities that i will do in the month, budget spent and control, sound design checklist and 3D model creation checklist. Trello is also a must have for day to day work.

Where did you get the word out about your new game?

Aspects of Change was launched around September, on Steam. The launch process was a bit overwhelming, with contracts and a lot of bureaucracy, but it was definitely worth it.  At the time, I had nowhere to promote my game to a larger audience, so I sent it to friends and family. The launch was surprisingly smooth. I had about 12 friends play it and none of them reported any glitches or crashes.

What are some of the most effective ways that you attract people to your game?

For Aspects of change, I’d say that the game has a different concept and is put together well. You can experience a fun strategy game for about 2 dollars.

With Reading in the Dark, I hope to bring a bone chilling experience with unique visuals and story. Gameplay-wise,  the game takes inspiration from a lot of the big horror games of our generation with my spin on it.

What are your sources of inspiration?

Currently, my main sources of inspiration are horror games like Amnesia: the dark descent, Outlast, Resident Evil and Silent Hill. These games were incredible horror experiences that I lived through growing up, and I am doing my best to dissect what made these games great and bring that essence over to Reading in the Dark. The level design and item management from Resident evil, the storytelling from Outlast, the fluid gameplay and good pacing from Amnesia and the terrifying creatures from Silent Hill.

Movies also help me out in terms of pacing and storytelling. Films like Jeepers creepers and Sinister. They help me to build the world and characters in a more convincing and creepy way, adding a lot to the experience of the final user. 

When it comes down to producing and enduring anxiety and fear of being bombarded with dislikes, my dad is my biggest inspiration. He is a man of focus, commitment and sheer will, like John Wick. He helps me keep going after the euphoria is gone.

Do you have any advice for other entrepreneurs or game creators?

This might be the most important tip that I learned. 

Never stop being organized, this can save a big project from failing. Keep track of chronograms, deadlines and checklists. Never hesitate to spend extra time in the planning phases.

Another important one is that you must find ways to keep yourself excited for your project. Since we only get paid after investing hours of hard work, we can easily lose ourselves and give up on projects that could take years. Being excited about a project when you just started it is easy, but after a while it starts to get increasingly hard. That is why you need to know yourself and what you can do to not lose this grip.

How are things today and what are your plans for the future?

Things are looking very bright. Right now I am working hard on developing Reading in the Dark, managing my Youtube channel and studying sculpting in Zbrush. In the future I am planning on creating more character models using my new found knowledge of sculpting, combined with the knowledge I have from rigging and animation in blender.

Where can we learn more?

You can find me on my Youtube channel: Krimson Koala, here’s a link:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCY9q7Cr9g9hcdrWLLrVFQ0A?

There, I show what I am working on for Reading in the Dark, as well as discuss game development and study good game design from the big successes of the industry.

Also, here is a link for the Aspects of Change steam store page:

https://store.steampowered.com/app/1136470/Aspects_of_change/

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